smartereveryday:

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.

As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  

What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.

I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

cool-critters:

Tamandua

Tamandua is a genus of anteaters with two species: the southern tamandua and the northern tamandua. The northern tamandua ranges from southeastern Mexico south throughout Central America, and in South America west of the Andes from northern Venezuela to northern Peru. Southern tamanduas are found from Venezuela and Trinidad to northern Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay. They live in forests and grasslands, are semiarboreal, and possess partially prehensile tails. They mainly eat ants and termites, but they occasionally eat bees, beetles, and insect larvae. They have no teeth and depend on their powerful gizzards to break down their food. The tamanduas are nocturnal, active at night and secreting away in hollow tree trunks and burrows abandoned by other animals during daylight hours. They spend up to half of their time in the treetops, as much as 64%, where they forage for arboreal ants and termites. Tamanduas move rather awkwardly on the ground. They walk on the sides on their clenched forefeet to avoid injuring their palms with their sharp claws. The tamandua’s small eyes afford limited vision. Instead of relying on their sense of sight, they primarily utilize their senses of smell and hearing to locate their insect prey.

photo credits: chbecker, ferrebeekeeper, Quartl, wiki

darkimperialblue:

Jellyfish lady.

A fairly old drawing that I found and decided to quickly finish.

REBLOG | Posted 1 hour ago With 255 notes
tags: #jerryfiss

sonianeverlime:

sleepy-tanuki:

A few weeks ago my japanese class did a gift exchange with our penpal class in japan and their box of stuff came in today. All of the gifts had really cute messages on yellow notes. This one was my favorite..image

LETS BECOME DIABETES

yes-percyjacksonismylife:

theodd1sout:

I cannot stress this enough, it’s the only requirement to be my friend. 

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I EXPECTED SOMETHING DEEPLY EMOTIONAL
BUT NO
I LEARNED WHAT NOT TO DO
IF I WANNA BECOME THIS GUY’S FRIEND

allyourfavesareasexual:

twitter user foxylalonde telling it like it is

Track:
this is IMPORTANT
Plays:
6,424 plays

marikairi:

[Nitori’s VA] shark gAOWWWWWW

sousukesshoulder:

Sousuke's advice: Ep. 4 vs. Ep. 7